The relevance of (South African) Renaissance studies

Wright, L.S. (2005) The relevance of (South African) Renaissance studies. Shakespeare in Southern Africa, 17 . pp. 19-25. ISSN 1011-582X

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Abstract

This paper is part of a longer piece devoted to the elucidation of two related propositions. The first is that in South Africa the humanities in general, and Renaissance Studies in particular, are stymied by a lack of strategic thinking from those in the academy. The second is that the humanities, and Renaissance Studies, and Shakespeare, are valid and needed in this country, possibly as never before. This paper tackles the latter question, the challenge of intrinsic relevance. What possible bearing have art and literature, politics and religion, customs and technologies developed 10,000 kilometres away and nearly half a millennium ago to do with South Africa in the 21st century? I steal up on the main issue by outlining an abbreviated rhetoric of relevance, establishing a framework within which intrinsic relevance can be conceptualised for Renaissance Studies today.

Item Type:Article
Additional Information:The second part of this position paper, 'Re-positioning Renaissance Studies in South Africa: Strategic Thinking or Business-As-Usual', appears in Shakespeare in Southern Africa 18 (2006), pp 1-9. Professor Laurence Wright is Director and Head of the Institute for the Study of English in Africa (ISEA), Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa
Uncontrolled Keywords:relevance; Jonson; The Devil is an Ass; East India Company; The African Theatre; Cape Town; Sir George Yonge; Lord Macartney; Rohan Quince; Dieter Reible; King Lear; Yael Farber; SeZaR; Immanuel Wallerstein; Spengler; Toynbee; David Wilkinson; Elias Pater; The Damned; education; English literature; humanities; relevance; Shakespeare, W. Renaissance studies; Africa; South Africa
Subjects:Y Unknown > Subjects to be assigned
Divisions:Research Institutes and Units > Institute for the Study of English in Africa (ISEA)
ID Code:1357
Deposited By: Prof Laurence Wright
Deposited On:11 May 2009
Last Modified:06 Jan 2012 16:20
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