Dominant and non-dominant group's perceptions of the government-led economic transformation process in South Africa : report.

Dlamini, Thobile G. K. (2009) Dominant and non-dominant group's perceptions of the government-led economic transformation process in South Africa : report. Masters thesis, Rhodes University.

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Abstract

The enormous social, economic, and political government-led societal transformation South Africans have experienced over the past 15 years have brought about numerous societal and identity changes. The aim of the present study was to explore how dominant (White participants) and non-dominant (Black participants) groups experiencing the government-led societal transformation process deal with perceptions of intergroup differences based on Social Identity Theory (Tajfel & Turner, 1979, 1986) and related field research. Social Identity Theory predicts that in the presence of intergroup differences group members irrespective of their status position will apply identity management strategies to either improve or maintain their status position. The relationships between perceptions of intergroup relations and identity management strategies as proposed by Social Identity Theory were tested studying 170 second year Rhodes University psychology students. Sixty participants indicated themselves as Black South Africans (representing non-dominant group) and 110 participants identified themselves as White South Africans (dominant group). The results revealed that dominant and non-dominant groups differ systematically regarding the functional interaction between beliefs about the intergroup situation and identity management strategies. The results of the study indicate too, that ingroup identification differentiates between individual and collective strategies irrespective of the group’s status position.

Item Type:Thesis (Masters)
Uncontrolled Keywords:Group identity - South Africa, Post-apartheid era - South Africa, South Africa - Ethnic relations, Social change - South Africa, South Africa - Social conditions - 1994-, South Africa - Economic conditions - 1991-
Subjects:B Philosophy. Psychology. Religion > BF Psychology
Divisions:Faculty > Faculty of Humanities > Psychology
Supervisors:Böhmke, Werner
ID Code:1824
Deposited By: Ms Chantel Clack
Deposited On:07 Dec 2010 07:53
Last Modified:06 Jan 2012 16:21
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