Above ground woody community attributes, biomass and carbon stocks along a rainfall gradient in the savannas of the central lowveld, South Africa

Shackleton, C.M. and Scholes, R.J (2011) Above ground woody community attributes, biomass and carbon stocks along a rainfall gradient in the savannas of the central lowveld, South Africa. South African Journal of Botany, 77 (1). pp. 184-192. ISSN 0254-6299

[img]
Preview
Text
Above ground woody community attributes.pdf

540Kb

Official URL: http://www.journals.elsevier.com/south-african-jou...

Abstract

Enumeration of carbon stocks at benchmark sites is a necessary activity in assessing the potential carbon sequestration and possible generation of credits through restoration of intensively impacted sites. However, there is a lack of empirical studies throughout much of the savannas of sub-Saharan Africa, including South Africa. We report an estimation of species specific and site biomass and carbon stocks, and general vegetation structural attributes from three protected areas along a rainfall gradient in the central lowveld, South Africa. Estimates of biomass and carbon stocks were effected through destructive sampling to establish locally derived allometric equations. There was a gradient of increasing woody density, height of the canopy, number of species, density of regenerative stems and a greater proportion of stems in small size classes from the arid locality to the mesic locality, with the semi-arid locality being intermediate. The proportion of spinescent species decreased with increasing rainfall. The mesic locality was significantly more woody than either the arid or semi-arid sites, having double the biomass, four times the density and 40% higher basal area. Above ground carbon pools were also higher; carbon stocks were approximately 9 t/ha for the arid and semi-arid sites and 18 t/ha for the mesic site.

Item Type:Article
Uncontrolled Keywords:South Africa; Allometry; Basal area; Biomass; Carbon; Lowveld; Savanna; Mesophyllous; Microphyllous; Rainfall gradient; Volume
Subjects:G Geography. Anthropology. Recreation > GE Environmental Sciences
Q Science > QK Botany
Divisions:Faculty > Faculty of Science > Environmental Science
ID Code:2418
Deposited By: Prof Charlie Shackleton
Deposited On:28 Mar 2012 13:03
Last Modified:28 Mar 2012 13:03
6 full-text download(s) since 28 Mar 2012 13:03
6 full-text download(s) in the past 12 months
More statistics...

Repository Staff Only: item control page